Why it is Worth it

Shalom and Merry Meet guys,

As I have been surfing trough both Pagan and Israeli blogs today a thought hit me: Perhaps one reason why I can emphasize with the Jewish – or Zionist, if you prefer that term – case is me being Pagan. No, not precisely me being Pagan actually. It’s sometimes, without talking about it a lot, secretly imagining a place where being Pagan was as normal as being a Jew is in Israel. Where at Beltaine it wasn’t only my own place that was decorated nicely with summer flowers but where every shop would have a small display in its window and everybody at work wold be that little excited as people use to be on a day before a holiday. Where I could just join in the common feeling instead of having to force it into a world where hardly anybody would even know that it was the day before Beltaine. Stuff like that, so small yet so powerful.

I hear those who say that Jews needn’t move to Israel and set up a Jewish State and all of that for they as well may have practiced their customs in the countries of their diaspora. Countries which for sure served as decent new homes to a lot of families. Sure enough there are sufficient places where Jews needn’t fear persecution because of their religion – or ethnicity – anymore. Just take New York City Jewish communities: From that point of view they might happen to be safer in the US then they would ever be in Israel where you could get killed for being a Jew while having a coffee with some friends way more easily.

Yet is that really all that counts? The freedom and possibility of performing your religion and customs as you are used to – as important as it is. It’s easy to say so if you are living your country’s mainstream religion and customs. If you never had to go through a Christmas eve with everybody else at work like on every other day. If you never had to do holiday shopping with no holiday-decoration and no holiday-related goods spread out all around you and no nice Christmas carols filling the air. Well, you might enjoy it the first time, but the second time? Or the third? And what about your children, wouldn’t you wish you could give them that feeling of a whole country – or continent – celebrating that great holiday with them? In the end there still is a difference between the possibility to do something and living in a place where it is joined in by everybody, even strangers. Where it is just normal. The feeling is a completely different one. I am so sick of may poles in basements.

We Pagans are likely never to get that place where we can have malls decorated for Beltaine. We are likely to have our kids being the only Pagan kids in kindergarten – which is a thing that scares the crap out of me – even if they hopefully will be strong enough to be rather interesting to others then the odd man out. Perhaps the truth is I envy Israelis for having that place I can only dream about. And perhaps that’s why I think it is worth it. Not displacing people, I mean, it’s another question how much about the „nakba“ is young Madinat Ysrael‘s fault and yet another one how those who, without doing anything wrong have been caught between the fronts of a terrible conflict between politicians can be reconciled. What I mean rather is it’s worth staying and fighting. It’s worth not giving in to terrorists and militias. It’s worth fighting the feeling that you are surrounded by enemies. If I had a place like that for my kids I’d definitely stand up and fight for it – with pen and sword if necessary.

yours,

Migdalit

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5 comments

  1. Is it worth creating this new pagan nation on land that is already occupied and forcibly moving that indigenous population?

  2. Hi Edmund, thanks for dropping by.

    May I quote from my posting as an answer?

    “And perhaps that’s why I think it is worth it. Not displacing people, I mean, it’s another question how much about the „nakba“ is young Madinat Ysrael’s fault and yet another one how those who, without doing anything wrong have been caught between the fronts of a terrible conflict between politicians can be reconciled.”

  3. You follow that section by saying

    “It’s worth not giving in to terrorists and militias. It’s worth fighting the feeling that you are surrounded by enemies. If I had a place like that for my kids I’d definitely stand up and fight for it – with pen and sword if necessary”

    So you support taking the land that other people live on and kicking them out and then you further support military action against the indigenous people.

    Doesn’t that line of logic bother you? Don’t the indegenous people have the same right of pen and sword?

  4. no, Migdalit does not….she said whats a fault of another time….
    She said building up such state is worth it….and she said in case of Israel faults was done at the time when they did. She is in this matter very well informed and differenciates between diferent arguments and facts and the responsibilities for it.
    What is I think what she tried to say to you and whats a thing in this I think she is absolute right to do so…or would you also judge todays Germans on the 3rd Reich todays Amerikans on hiroshima, Todays Spanish for robbing out the nka and Maya cultures and later the brittish for taking native americans land?

    I think also you can not judge todays Israel for Faults done by european nations the UN and the later Israelit people – but you can for not learning out of it…if you can argument for why this is the case.

  5. Thanks for posting, Aracuron

    Dear Edmund: Actually I think the place where you misstook my intentions is that I wasn’t talking about the foundation of this “own land” – may it be the Jewish or Pagan state – especially for as I wrote I don’t suppose the foundation of a “Pagan State” will be possible in the forseeable future (one reason for that being that it would mean taking other people’s land). What I was writing about in the sentences you quotet wasn’t _taking_ that land and it wasn’t taking more land. It is about fighting for what there is. _Defending_, not conquering. “_not giving in_ to terrorists and militias”.
    Terrorists and militias as in Hamas firing rockets at Western Negev from Gaza. As in terrorists commiting suicide attacks (which’s number thank godess has decreased a big deal over the last years). I was talking about not going away, not despairing even facing an enemy like Iran (the Irani government to be specific as this is a war between governments burdened onto the shoulders of people who never wanted it, never contributed to it. I just feel I cannot stretch that point often enough).

    There is no word in the article about going there in the first place. There is no word in it about enhancing Israel’s land.
    Whether it was “right” or “wrong” that Israel was etabilshed in the first place wasn’t topic of that article and it wasn’t meant to. And whether the Hebrews or the Palestinians or anynbody else is “indigenous” wasn’t topic of this article. It was and will be topic of other articles, but not of this one. I know that with Israel/PA it’s though and it’s complicated and everything’s interconnected in many dimensions with everything else but still I feel that the only way to look at it is from different perspecitives and that does include the makro-perspecitve as well.

    Thanks though for dropping by. I am always happy if there is the possibility to talk and exchange worldviews and oppinions.

    edit: One more sentence for you, Edmund: the sentence you quoted above started with “if I had that land” …

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